Mom Shares Her Struggles From When She First Arrived In the Country as an Immigrant

PDF    QR Code    Add to Class   
+75 -25
- [Daughter] What kinds of jobs did you have since first arriving in the country?

- [Mother] We were gardeners, and we were cleaning offices.

- I remember the offices.

- You remember that? We had the night shift cleaning. That's why, you know, we had to take you and your brother. I didn't have a babysitter.

- I have memories of running into everyone's office and eating candy from their candy dishes. I remember being with my brother in our pajamas with the little plastic feet. And I also remember you would always buy us a Cupa Noodle from the vending machine. Like a snack and then put us to bed on people's office couches, and then you'd carry us to the car when you guys were done cleaning the offices. I remember that. Did they ever know? Did your bosses ever know that you took your kids?

- No, I don't think so.

- Is there anything that you've never told me but want to tell me now?

- When we first came here, we went through a lot of things like not eating. I guess, for six months, your father lost his job and we never told you that.

- I do remember a lot of beans, bean tacos.

- But when you ask us, "Why the same thing?" Remember?

- Yeah.

- I didn't want to tell you why.

- If you could do everything again, would you raise me differently?

- I would dedicate more time, I guess. I was so busy going to school, too, that I guess I neglected you a little bit.

- No. For me, watching you go to school with two kids and trying to make ends meet, that was the biggest inspiration for me to finish college. I thought, there's nothing that could stand in my way that didn't stand in yours more. So it's the most important thing for me having gone to college. And I feel like anything I do from here on out is okay because I've already achieved my dream. Everything else is icing on the cake.
http://www.upworthy.com/storycorps-presents-who-we-are-blanca-and-connie-alvarez


When Connie's family came from Mexico to the U.S. in 1972, her mother, Blanca Alvarez, was pregnant with Connie.

Even after Connie was born, her family's first years in America weren't easy. Sometimes they didn't have anything to eat. Sometimes they had to take any job they could to get by. Sometimes Blanca had to take the kids to work with her or make due with bean tacos when there was nothing else to eat.

Like most working parents, Blanca says she regrets not dedicating more time to her daughter.

The curious thing is that what Blanca thought would make Connie feel resentful or neglected is actually what motivated her daughter to push forward.

"For me, watching you go to school with two kids and trying to make ends meet — that was the biggest inspiration for me to finish college," Connie says.
- [Daughter] What kinds of jobs did you have since first arriving in the country?

- [Mother] We were gardeners, and we were cleaning offices.

- I remember the offices.

- You remember that? We had the night shift cleaning. That's why, you know, we had to take you and your brother. I didn't have a babysitter.

- I have memories of running into everyone's office and eating candy from their candy dishes. I remember being with my brother in our pajamas with the little plastic feet. And I also remember you would always buy us a Cupa Noodle from the vending machine. Like a snack and then put us to bed on people's office couches, and then you'd carry us to the car when you guys were done cleaning the offices. I remember that. Did they ever know? Did your bosses ever know that you took your kids?

- No, I don't think so.

- Is there anything that you've never told me but want to tell me now?

- When we first came here, we went through a lot of things like not eating. I guess, for six months, your father lost his job and we never told you that.

- I do remember a lot of beans, bean tacos.

- But when you ask us, "Why the same thing?" Remember?

- Yeah.

- I didn't want to tell you why.

- If you could do everything again, would you raise me differently?

- I would dedicate more time, I guess. I was so busy going to school, too, that I guess I neglected you a little bit.

- No. For me, watching you go to school with two kids and trying to make ends meet, that was the biggest inspiration for me to finish college. I thought, there's nothing that could stand in my way that didn't stand in yours more. So it's the most important thing for me having gone to college. And I feel like anything I do from here on out is okay because I've already achieved my dream. Everything else is icing on the cake.
http://www.upworthy.com/storycorps-presents-who-we-are-blanca-and-connie-alvarez


When Connie's family came from Mexico to the U.S. in 1972, her mother, Blanca Alvarez, was pregnant with Connie.

Even after Connie was born, her family's first years in America weren't easy. Sometimes they didn't have anything to eat. Sometimes they had to take any job they could to get by. Sometimes Blanca had to take the kids to work with her or make due with bean tacos when there was nothing else to eat.

Like most working parents, Blanca says she regrets not dedicating more time to her daughter.

The curious thing is that what Blanca thought would make Connie feel resentful or neglected is actually what motivated her daughter to push forward.

"For me, watching you go to school with two kids and trying to make ends meet — that was the biggest inspiration for me to finish college," Connie says.
+75 -25
Quiz #: 31698
Blanca Alvarez came to the US from Mexico in 1972. She crossed the border with her husband and son, while pregnant with their daughter Connie. Blanca and Connie talk about the sacrifices their family had to make to reach their American dream.
Quiz by: rmd
Intermediate

Dictionary

Powered by Oxford



Quiz #: 31698
Blanca Alvarez came to the US from Mexico in 1972. She crossed the border with her husband and son, while pregnant with their daughter Connie. Blanca and Connie talk about the sacrifices their family had to make to reach their American dream.
Quiz by: rmd
Intermediate




Why show ads?